Report says Diabetes makes Dramatic Rise

During the past 15 years, the U.S. has seen a big rise in the rates of diabetes cases, according to a Centers for Disease Control study. The recently published study suggests that the rise is due likely to people who have diabetes living a longer life, as well as the number of new cases being diagnosed.

The new report showed that from 1995 to 2000 the rates of diagnosed diabetes, throughout each state in the U.S., Puerto Rico and the District of Columbia, increased 50% or higher in 42 states and jumped by 100% in 18 of the states.

In 1995, only Puerto Rico, the District of Columbia and three states had rates of 6 of 100 people or higher that had been diagnosed with the disorder. However, in 2010, all 50 states had a diabetes prevalence of over 6%.

Regionally, the South showed the largest increases followed by the West, the Midwest and the Northeast. The largest increases by states were in Oklahoma with an increase of 226%, Kentucky with a 158% increase, Georgia with 145% and Washington with 135%.

The recently released report showed in 2010 that Puerto Rico and six states had a diagnosed rate of diabetes of at least 10 adults for every 100 adults. Those six states are all in the southern part of the U.S. and Appalachia and include West Virginia, Tennessee, South Carolina, Alabama, Mississippi and Texas.

The states were diabetes had the lowest diagnoses in 2010, which is between 6% and 6.9% were Alaska, Connecticut, Colorado, Montana, Minnesota, Oregon, North and South Dakota, Wisconsin, Wyoming and Vermont.

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